Living Peacefully with your Family as Your Parents Age

Love’s Way, a new book by Carolyn Parr and Sig Cohen, is the single best resource for aging peacefully that I know of. These two experienced mediators have written a practical and comprehensive guide for anyone conscious of moving from midlife autonomy to increasing interdependence with family or friends. As the subtitle suggests, it’s about “living peacefully with your family as your parents age.”

Carolyn, a local judge and long-time member of Festival Church, draws from her experience in Church of the Saviour as well as her legal practice. Her mediation partner, Sig Cohen, is a retired Foreign Service officer with a keen eye for family dynamics. By alternating chapters, they cover a broad range of issues, from emotional roadblocks and sibling rivalry to economic and legal matters. The personal stories make it accessible and engaging.

Here is the list of topics featured on the back cover:

  • How to address family issues such as unhealed sibling rivalries, parental favoritism, greed and secrecy
  • How to navigate all the necessary legal documents such as wills and powers of attorney
  • How to promote forgiveness in your family and in your own heart
  • How to speak truth in love to parents, siblings, and children
  • How to let go and heal any family rifts.

Love’s Way can be purchased at The Potter’s House, from Hendrickson Publishers, or ordered from other commercial websites.

-Marjory Zoet Bankson, Seekers Church

Seven things People Forget To Do Before They Die

In this article in Yes!, an online magazine, Sydney Worth reviews the book Seven Things People Forget To Do Before They Die.  This book was written for a Canadian audience but can also be useful to Americans.  Amazon describes the book as follows: Death is a part of life. We used to understand this, and in the past, loved ones generally died at home with family around them. But in just a few generations, death has become a medical event, and we have lost the ability to make this last part of life more personal and meaningful. Today people want to regain control over health-care decisions for themselves and their loved ones. Talking About Death Won’t Kill You is the essential handbook to help Canadians navigate personal and medical decisions for the best quality of life for the end of our lives. Noted palliative-care educator and researcher Kathy Kortes-Miller shows readers how to identify and reframe limiting beliefs about dying with humor and compassion.

The first on the list of things people forget to do is:

1. Use the D-words.

Death, dying, and dead. Clear language rather than euphemisms such as “passed away” or “transitioned” can help loved ones recognize end of life as a normal event and provide better support.

To read about all seven things that people forget to do, click on the following link: https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/death/die-do-before-bucket-list-20190827

The Farewell

A matriarch’s family returns to China under the guise of a fake wedding to stealthily say goodbye to their beloved matriarch — the only person that doesn’t know she only has a few weeks to live.
To see the trailer, click on the following link:  https://a24films.com/films/the-farewell
“The Farewell” pays delightful, insightful homage to the facades and pretenses nearly everyone adopts in the name of compassion.
Ann Hornaday
A funny, emotionally intricate and deeply moving tale of severed connections and renewed family ties.
Joe Morgenstern
Awkwafina has gone from rapper to comedic powerhouse, and now, most powerfully, to indie darling in “The Farewell.” It’s one of the year’s sweetest films.
Johnny Oleksinski
New York Post
This is a simple but genius film that sheds light on Chinese culture and philosophy while delivering a doozy of a paradigm shift.
Tara McNamara
Common Sense Media

 

 

Personal Finance Academy at Montgomery College Institute for Lifelong Learning

the Montgomery College Institute for Lifelong Learning (http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/wdce/ce/lifelonglearning.html) offers a number of courses on financial planning that help participants plan their financial futures.  Courses include:

  • Health care insurance for retirement
  • The Thrift Savings Plan for federal employees and retireees
  • Maximizing Social Security Benefits
  • Probate in Maryland: An overview for executors-to-be
  • Protecting your hard-earned money (avoiding fraud)
  • Retirement distribution strategies
  • Retirement planning today
  • Stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and ETFs explained
  • Wills and estates

Students 60 and over are eligible for reduced tuition.