Having “The Conversation” — the Conversation Project

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The Conversation Project is dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end-of-life care.  The project provides “Conversation Starter Kits” to help you have the conversation with a family member, friend, or other loved one about your – or their – wishes regarding end-of-life care. It is available in several languages.  Talking with your loved ones openly and honestly, before a medical crisis happens, gives everyone a shared understanding about what matters most to you at the end of life. You can use this Starter Kit whether you are getting ready to tell someone else what you want, or you want to help someone else get ready to share their wishes.

All of the Starter Kits are available to download and print for free.  To learn more about the kits, click on the following link:

https://theconversationproject.org/starter-kits/#conversation-starter-kit


All-Day Smithsonian Workshop on Religious Views of Death

Death and Beyond: Comparative Reflections on World Religious Traditions

S. Dillon Ripley Center
1100 Jefferson Dr SW
Metro: Smithsonian (Mall exit)

Saturday, November 9, 2019 – 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Issues of death, dying, and the meaning of life—and the afterlife—hold key places in the belief systems of the major religious traditions of the world. Graham M. Schweig, a professor of philosophy and religion at Christopher Newport University, surveys differing visions of these themes from a variety of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives. Stories, teachings, and rituals from the major faiths, as well as contemporary interpretations, are examined to illuminate the ultimate life event: death.

9:30–10:45 a.m. Overview: Comparative Religions and Life After Death

What is religion? And what is the role of death, dying, and the afterlife in world religions?  Explore these topics as well as conceptions of the soul and the human struggle for purpose and meaning among the three major global religious systems.

11 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Semitic Traditions

Visions of death and the afterlife from the ancient Middle Eastern traditions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: key figures and tenets.

12:15–1:30 p.m.  Lunch (participants provide their own).

1:30–2:45 p.m. East Asian Traditions

Conceptions of death and the afterlife in Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and Buddhism.

3–4:15 p.m. South Asian Traditions and Modern Reflections

Hinduism, Jainism, and Sikhism are examined, as well as contemporary interpretations of themes on death, dying, and the afterlife.

To purchase tickets online, click on the following link:

https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/death-and-beyond-comparative-reflections-on-world-religious-traditions?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=OCT19eASmartSaturdays10.19.19&utm_content=version_A&promo=247468

 

Seven things People Forget To Do Before They Die

In this article in Yes!, an online magazine, Sydney Worth reviews the book Seven Things People Forget To Do Before They Die.  This book was written for a Canadian audience but can also be useful to Americans.  Amazon describes the book as follows: Death is a part of life. We used to understand this, and in the past, loved ones generally died at home with family around them. But in just a few generations, death has become a medical event, and we have lost the ability to make this last part of life more personal and meaningful. Today people want to regain control over health-care decisions for themselves and their loved ones. Talking About Death Won’t Kill You is the essential handbook to help Canadians navigate personal and medical decisions for the best quality of life for the end of our lives. Noted palliative-care educator and researcher Kathy Kortes-Miller shows readers how to identify and reframe limiting beliefs about dying with humor and compassion.

The first on the list of things people forget to do is:

1. Use the D-words.

Death, dying, and dead. Clear language rather than euphemisms such as “passed away” or “transitioned” can help loved ones recognize end of life as a normal event and provide better support.

To read about all seven things that people forget to do, click on the following link: https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/death/die-do-before-bucket-list-20190827

The Farewell

A matriarch’s family returns to China under the guise of a fake wedding to stealthily say goodbye to their beloved matriarch — the only person that doesn’t know she only has a few weeks to live.
To see the trailer, click on the following link:  https://a24films.com/films/the-farewell
“The Farewell” pays delightful, insightful homage to the facades and pretenses nearly everyone adopts in the name of compassion.
Ann Hornaday
A funny, emotionally intricate and deeply moving tale of severed connections and renewed family ties.
Joe Morgenstern
Awkwafina has gone from rapper to comedic powerhouse, and now, most powerfully, to indie darling in “The Farewell.” It’s one of the year’s sweetest films.
Johnny Oleksinski
New York Post
This is a simple but genius film that sheds light on Chinese culture and philosophy while delivering a doozy of a paradigm shift.
Tara McNamara
Common Sense Media