Seven things People Forget To Do Before They Die

In this article in Yes!, an online magazine, Sydney Worth reviews the book Seven Things People Forget To Do Before They Die.  This book was written for a Canadian audience but can also be useful to Americans.  Amazon describes the book as follows: Death is a part of life. We used to understand this, and in the past, loved ones generally died at home with family around them. But in just a few generations, death has become a medical event, and we have lost the ability to make this last part of life more personal and meaningful. Today people want to regain control over health-care decisions for themselves and their loved ones. Talking About Death Won’t Kill You is the essential handbook to help Canadians navigate personal and medical decisions for the best quality of life for the end of our lives. Noted palliative-care educator and researcher Kathy Kortes-Miller shows readers how to identify and reframe limiting beliefs about dying with humor and compassion.

The first on the list of things people forget to do is:

1. Use the D-words.

Death, dying, and dead. Clear language rather than euphemisms such as “passed away” or “transitioned” can help loved ones recognize end of life as a normal event and provide better support.

To read about all seven things that people forget to do, click on the following link: https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/death/die-do-before-bucket-list-20190827

Where are all the books about menopause?
Novels about coming of (old) age